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RATES & SERVICES

Packages for community and professional theatre productions are available. If you're interested in having your production photographed, check out the information below and contact me to discuss rates and services.

 

Prices may be negotiable based upon your theatre's or production's budget. Let me know what you're looking for, and we can find a happy medium together! If you're working on a limited budget, I'd love to discuss options for your production. Contact me and I guarantee we can work something out.

(Please note that out of respect for performers, reviewers, and patrons,

I refrain from photographing public performances unless absolutely necessary.)

 

Typically, rates and services look something like this:

PROMOTIONAL PHOTOS

Services include

  • travel to venue

  • professionally edited for blemishes, wrinkles, flyaways, lighting, color, and other imperfections (edits suitable for advertising and social media)

  • at least 35 high resolution images 

  • 1-week turn-around for edits 

NOTE: Backdrops and/or photoshoot locations are the responsibility of the theatre company, but I am happy to provide suggestions for suitable locations around the Orlando area if needed.

Rates:

  • Professional theatre brick-and-mortar houses (non-AEA and AEA): $450

  • Community theatre and independent theatre companies without a permanent space: $400

PRODUCTION PHOTOS

(includes photos for designer portfolios)

Services include

  • travel to theatre venue

  • 15 minute consultation with director, cast, and crew

  • full photographic coverage of the dress rehearsal performance

  • professionally edited for framing, lighting, and color (edits suitable for advertising, social media, archival purposes, and designer portfolios)

  • at least 150 high resolution images 

  • 48-hour turn-around for edits

Rates:

  • Professional theatre brick-and-mortar houses (non-AEA and AEA): $350

  • Community theatre and independent theatre companies without a permanent space: $300

Additionally, directors have the opportunity to choose from the following:

  1. perimeter shots (photographer takes photos from perimeter of stage)  

  2. in-scene shots (photographer takes photos on the stage, avoiding actors and set pieces/props)

  3. both

 

 

FAQ

"Why do promotional photos cost more than production photos?"

 

For a few different reasons, thanks for asking!

  • Typically, promotional photos require more work on the part of the photographer; there is creative lighting, positioning, coaching, and more back and forth communication between the photographer and the creative team. Additionally, edits take longer, too! Editing out imperfections like blemishes, wrinkles in fabric, and flyaways to achieve a flawless look for advertising and social media takes more time.

  • Production photos require less work on the part of the photographer because the lighting, set, props, and actors are already set for the run of the show, which means the photographer isn't doing as much mental work to achieve the final picture. Production photos are typically a point, frame, and capture exercise without much, if any, back and forth communication between the photographer and the creative team. Additionally, edits usually don't take as long: there is typically a copy/paste technique we use in a program called Lightroom that allows edits to quickly be used across multiple images, AND edits for imperfections are typically unnecessary due to the "truthful" nature of theatre. (Ex: if someone's hair is partially covering their face in an intense scene, but we can still see their face, this may lend itself well to the truth of the scene and composition of the image.)

"What makes a community theatre, an independent theatre company without a permanent space, or a professional theatre brick-and-mortar house?"

 

This question has a few answers depending on who you ask in the theatre community, but these are my definitions:

  • Community theatre: a theatre company that does not pay their artists (artists work solely on volunteer basis). Produces work in a building they rent/own full-time or produces work in various spaces throughout the community. (Tips are not considered pay.)

  • Independent theatre company without a permanent space: a professional theatre company that does pay their performers and creative team a weekly paycheck or stipend (preferably a living wage), OR profit share. Produces work in various spaces throughout the community because they do not have permanent access to a brick-and-mortar space.

  • Professional theatre brick-and-mortar house: a theatre company that does pay their performers and creative team a weekly paycheck or stipend (preferably a living wage). Produces work in a building they rent/own full-time.

"Do you do headshots or lifestyle photoshoots?"

 

It depends.

Part of the reason I specialize in theatrical photography is because it requires less interaction with people I don't know very well. I have intense social anxiety and I'm neurodivergent, and one-on-one sessions are very difficult for me unless I know the person, either through working with them in a professional setting or knowing them socially. As a neurodivergent person, when I have to mask (or pretend to be "normal") for an extended period of time, especially in a one-on-one session, I become extremely tired, which means I have to rest (instead of editing the photos I took). If you want to know more about ADHD/Autism and how it manifests in different people, check out the Autistic Self Advocacy Network.

"What equipment do you use?"

 

I don't believe in gatekeeping industry or creative information. There is room for all of us. Here's my gear!

  • Camera: Nikon Z 50 (mirrorless)

  • Lenses: Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G, AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-200mm F/3.5-5.6G ED VR II

  • Software: Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop

  • Computer: MacBook Pro 16-inch (2023), Apple M2 Pro chip

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